All posts tagged: well-being

Caveat Meditator

| INT. – A bookstore in Rishikesh, India – Afternoon | I am with a yoga teacher from the west. She is browsing the shelves for herself, but then remembers that I, her student, am present. She hands me a book. “Here, this is good. You should read this and practice the exercises.” The book she has handed me is on advanced breathing techniques. While it is a good book, it is not a good book for me at this stage. Curiously, she has not asked me essential questions about my previous training, interests, and goals; so how does she know that this is appropriate for me? Simple answer: she does not know. She has not asked me the questions because this retreat she has organized is not for me or other participants. It is for herself. And this book is not for me—not yet. What little I do know about advanced breathing techniques: they are powerful. One must proceed with proper training, adequate knowledge, and competent guidance. Otherwise, it could be dangerous. This book requires far more …

On the Waves of Thoughts

More than 14 million books Published over a period of 125 years (1855 – 2019) In 3 languages (English, German, Spanish) Add machine learning and algorithms that tirelessly seek and identify textual markers of “cognitive distortions” — thinking patterns associated with anxiety and depression — for researchers to analyze. And? They analyzed. And? The interdisciplinary team of researchers found that the language records show a surge of cognitive distortions since the 1980s. Suggesting? In fact, entire societies may be getting more depressed — and this may correlate with new technologies and “social” media. Aha. Before you say, “I knew it; I just had a feeling” — just consider if that may indicate a cognitive distortion… Find information on the cognitive distortion schemata used in the study here, and below a brief overview: 12 Cognitive Distortions 1. Catastrophizing Exaggerating the importance of negative events Examples: “will go wrong” and “will never end” 2. Dichotomous Reasoning Thinking that an inherently continuous situation can only fall into two categories Examples: “everything” and “nothing” 3. Disqualifying the Positive Unreasonably …